Posts tagged mortgage

New Year Update

It’s that time again.

Memberships to renew. Annual fees to be paid. Educational requirements to meet.

Time to take stock of this crazy business and ask whether or not it’s worth carrying on.

Unlike last year, when I gave serious consideration to packing it in, I have no reservations about continuing to sell real estate in the Twin Cities in 2010.

In fact, I’ve never been more confident in my my ability to grow under these challenging market conditions.

In 2009, I doubled the number of transactions I completed (granted, I had to work MUCH harder to get these deals to the table). I also increased my client  and experience base. I facilitated sales to investors, sold HUD homes, short sales, newly foreclosed properties and became something of an expert in communicating with banks in order to facilitate mortgage modifications.

2009 also saw banks tightening up their requirements, which means that buyers are buying less expensive homes. Appraisers have also cleaned up their act. Gone are the days when appraisers just walked around a prospective home and just told the lender what they wanted to hear to get the deal done.

First time home buyers (still the meat and potatoes of my business) are having a completely different experience then buyers had just a couple years ago; onerous lender requirements (sometimes changing on a daily basis), higher levels of disclosure, greater scrutiny of an individuals ability to pay back the loan…..

Is this bad?

Absolutely not!

Lending practices had gotten so free and loose, that it’s no surprise that the pendulum has swung far in the other direction.

I expect that we have another year or so of challenges ahead; foreclosures, short sales, lender mediated transactions and the like before we see the housing market stabilize.

But whatever the coming year may hold, you can trust that I’ll still be there to serve your real estate needs.

And perhaps more importantly, I’ll still be on my bike.

In fact, I’m on my way to show a few homes in Longfellow.

Thanks for the support.

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Do Not Panic

The two, formerly private home mortgage giants, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are now under the control of the Federal Government.

Sounds kind of scary, doesn’t it?

But what does it REALLY mean?

Here’s the official party line for the National Association of Realtors:

What the Government Takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac Means to Housing Industry

In short-term, home sales should improve as mortgage rates fall.

Washington, D.C. (September 8, 2008) — The federal government’s takeover of secondary mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac should cause a drop in mortgage rates in the short term that benefits home buyers, but the long-term outlook is too early to call. NAR fully supports the action of the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Housing Finance Agency.

The federal government had no choice. The capital situation of the tow companies was not enough to handle the fallout from rising mortgage defaults in the near future. In addition, investors who purchase Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac debt have lost confidence in the two.

In a statement, NAR commended the Treasury’s action, announced yesterday, to bring stability and continued liquidity to the mortgage market. “The plan will help restore confidence in the secondary mortgage market,” said NAR President Richard F. Gaylord. “We appreciate the steps taken to calm the market, make mortgages more widely available and protect taxpayers. We look forward to working with the administration and Congress to ensure the continued vibrancy of the secondary mortgage market.”

Summary of what the Treasury actually did and what it means:

In the takeover, Treasury placed the GSEs into a conservatorship — similar to a Chapter 11 bankruptcy — which fully protects taxpayers from conflicts of interest between taxpayers and shareholders or current management.

The federal government is authorized to take up to an 80 percent stake in the companies, will review their financial condition quarterly, and inject money into the operations as needed. That means the market for GSE securities will be treated more like Treasury obligations, which should push mortgage interest rates down. That in turn, is expected to speed up home sales and help stabilize home prices.

The GSEs will be allowed to increase their mortgage funding over the next year and a half to help stabilize markets. Starting in 2010, the plan calls for them to reduce their portfolios.

The heads of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have been relieved of their duties. Treasury selected HErbert Allison, former Merrill Lynch vice chairman, to lead Fannie Mae and David Moffett, former U.S. Bancorp CFO, to guide Freddie Mac.

What I take from this is, investors who had previously been running from Fannie May and Freddie Mac, will now have the confidence in those companies that they will not go belly up, and will therefor invest in their mortgage futures.

In the short term, this will lower interest rates. This has already happened as I’ve seen rates drop below 6% for the first time since 2005.

Inventory on available homes is still at record highs, and sellers are motivated and pricing their homes accordingly.

In other words-Do Not Panic

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